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No truth in ‘threat letter’ allegations: US

State Dept spokesperson Ned Price says US is closely following developments in Pakistan; China hopes all parties in Pakistan can maintain solidarity
Updated 01 Apr, 2022 02:44pm
A combination of file photos show White House Communications Director Kate Bedingfield (L) and US State Department spokesperson Ned Price during weekly press briefings.
A combination of file photos show White House Communications Director Kate Bedingfield (L) and US State Department spokesperson Ned Price during weekly press briefings.
‘China always follows the principle of non-interference in other countries’ internal affairs,’ Chinese foreign ministry spokesperson Wang Wenbin said in a weekly press briefing. Reuters/File
‘China always follows the principle of non-interference in other countries’ internal affairs,’ Chinese foreign ministry spokesperson Wang Wenbin said in a weekly press briefing. Reuters/File

The United States has denied any allegations pertaining to toppling the Prime Minister Imran Khan-led government through a no-confidence motion tabled by the opposition in the National Assembly.

In what appeared to be a slip of tongue, the prime minister in his address to the nation on Thursday night named the US as the country that was reportedly behind the “threat letter.” He had added that for an independent country, such a message was not only against its prime minister but was also against the country itself.

“Well, we are closely following developments in Pakistan, and we respect, we support Pakistan’s constitutional process and the rule of law. But when it comes to those allegations, there is no truth to them,” US State Department spokesperson Ned Price said in response to a question pertaining to the premier’s statement.

PM Imran Khan blames US for impending regime change

Moreover, White House Communications Director Kate Bedingfield also denied such allegations. “There is absolutely no truth to that allegation,” she said in response to accusations that the US was working with the opposition to remove him from power.

PM Imran has almost lost the majority in the lower house of parliament after its coalition partners signed agreements with the united opposition, aimed at “resolving their issues.” Though with a few seats, many coalition partners have reached an agreement with the united opposition and decided to vote against it on the day of the no-trust vote on April 3.

In his address, the premier had warned his allies and the opposition leaders that the nation would not forgive them. PM Imran, who in his Karachi address had claimed to have been waiting for such a political development, also said that he would “return stronger” no matter what the result would be on Sunday.

“Sunday will be a defining day in the country’s political history,” PM Imran said and urged the nation to identify those “traitors” who would be voting against him.

Pakistan envoy wrote the 'letter' carrying threat from foreign power, says PM Imran

Moreover, the Chinese foreign ministry was also asked a similar question related to the no-confidence in the weekly presser. A reporter asked if any change in leadership in Pakistan could impact China-Pakistan relations?

“China always follows the principle of non-interference in other countries' internal affairs,” Chinese foreign ministry spokesperson Wang Wenbin said in reply.

“As Pakistan’s all-weather strategic cooperative partner and friendly neighbour, China sincerely hopes that all parties in Pakistan can maintain solidarity and jointly uphold development and stability,” he added.

The “threat letter” came to light at the PTI rally in Islamabad on March 27. PM Imran holding a “piece of evidence” had claimed that the opposition’s no-confidence motion against him was a result of a “foreign conspiracy” because of his foreign policy. He alleged that funds were being channelled from abroad to oust him from power.

Later on Wednesday, the premier had shared the contents of the letter with a group of senior journalists. He had also invited the coalition party leaders – MQM-P’s Khalid Maqbool Siddiqui and BAP’s Khalid Magsi – but the latter refused to attend such a meeting.

The government has reiterated that the premier “would play till the last ball” while the opposition has claimed the premier has lost the majority and termed PM Imran “as a security threat” to the country.

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